Alignment Solutions Newsletter: The Key to Successful Workplace Change Efforts

April 23rd, 2014



The Key to Successful Workplace Change Efforts

Alignment solution: The key to successful workplace change efforts is building and maintaining quality relationships with your employees.  

There are all kinds of changes occurring in the workplace today – e.g., adapting to new economic realities, consolidating functions, and aligning resources with revised organizational priorities. Though they take a variety of forms, change efforts share one key element: people are involved. Add to that fact the reality that human beings tend to resist change, and you have a potential recipe for disaster. The key ingredient that enables success, yet too often is missing, is the quality of your employee relationships. The return on your investment in making your employees a high priority – i.e., devoting the time and energy necessary to nurture those connections – is an exponentially greater likelihood that your change effort will succeed.

Can the desired change be accomplished if you ignore the quality of your employee relationships? Perhaps. Will it be effective? Most likely no. The best case scenario when relationships are poor: the change effort will cost more (in dollars, time, energy diverted from productive activities) than it would otherwise. The worst case scenario: the organization is much worse off than it was before, with long-lasting negative effects. Why? When you effect change by ignoring its human elements, you end up with employees who may be compliant, but they aren’t committed. Negative effects include high levels of distrust and cynicism, decreased productivity, low morale, increased resistance, unwillingness to follow your lead, a climate of “us vs. them,” and lack of ownership of the desired result. The time you “gain” by failing to make employee relationships a high priority on the front end will be miniscule compared to the time you will have to spend later dealing with the negative repercussions of ignoring or downplaying the importance of the human element in change management.

Here are seven ways to create and maintain quality employee relationships that will make your workplace change efforts proceed more smoothly:

  1. Be open and honest. Share the bad news as well as the good.
  2. Don’t make promises you can’t keep. If you find you cannot keep a promise, immediately let employees know why.
  3. Ensure the change process and decisions are procedurally fair – i.e., transparent, free of bias, and with meaningful opportunities for input by employees at every step, not just at the end.
  4. Utilize a variety of media to communicate your message consistently and frequently.
  5. Listen to what’s on employees’ minds. Show that you truly have heard them. Seriously consider their concerns/suggestions/feedback.
  6. Paint employees into the picture as soon as possible – before the picture is fully or largely formed – so they feel a sense of ownership.
  7. Explain the decision process at each step. Opt for more inclusion vs. less.

To read about additional steps you can take to create and sustain excellent relationships with your employees, take a look at my recently published article Relationship Excellence: 9 Steps for Providing Relationship Leadership. Although the article was written for leaders in the fire and rescue service, its lessons are universal. There also are links to two previous articles in that relationship excellence series.


To find other articles and resources that may be of value to you, I invite you to visit my web site at www.BusinessAlignmentStrategies.com and my blog at www.OptimizeBusinessResults.com.


Alignment Solutions is a concise, bi-weekly newsletter written specifically to help organizational leaders optimize their business results. Your e-mail address is never shared with anyone for any reason. You may unsubscribe by clicking the link on the bottom of this e-mail.

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© 2014 Pat Lynch. All rights reserved.

Alignment Solutions Newsletter: How to Demonstrate Your Workgroup’s Value

April 22nd, 2014



How to Demonstrate Your Workgroup’s Value

Alignment solution: Successfully navigating your organization’s political environment does not require bragging or begging.

The workplace is a competitive environment. How can you ensure your team, function, or department obtains the resources it needs to achieve its goals? By demonstrating the value you provide in ways that catch the attention of your stakeholders.

Regardless of the size of your work group, the following process will help you identify and communicate in a compelling way the impact you have on your organization. For example, let’s consider how workgroups at a large public university might make a persuasive case for the value they provide. Like other public institutions, those in higher education have come under the microscope and suffered massive budget cutbacks. Thus demonstrating value has become more important than ever.

  1. Identify clearly the desired end result.
    For our example, the university’s vision is to prepare students for success in a changing world.

  2. List the ways that your workgroup affects that end result.
    This step is especially important for staff positions, as employees in those jobs don’t always see a direct connection between their work and the organization’s desired outcome. For example, custodial staff ensure the classrooms and offices are clean and safe so students can learn and faculty can teach. Trades workers maintain the classroom and office buildings where people learn and work. Human resource professionals ensure staff get the training they need to perform their jobs supporting student learning. Administrative assistants perform tasks that enable faculty to focus on teaching, students to focus on learning, and administrators to focus on supporting students’ success.

  3. Frame information so it provides a context that is meaningful for your specific stakeholders.
    Educating your members and stakeholders is key. Focus relentlessly on outcomes. Make sure your workgroup is able to show students how it enables their success. Demonstrate how you are using taxpayers’ money effectively to educate tomorrow’s leaders. Provide evidence of the quality of education students receive and how it will enable their success in life. Couch the information in ways that answer the implicit question that all stakeholders ask about the services you provide: “What’s in it for me?”

  4. Communicate the above information widely using a variety of media.
    Use words, pictures, charts, and graphs appropriately to get your stakeholders’ attention. Disseminate the information through an intranet, the university’s web site, social media outlets, newsletters, and interactions with students, staff, administrators, faculty, community members, and alumni.

  5. Assess the results and adjust as necessary.
    Monitor the results of your relentless focus on value. Tweak your efforts as necessary. Educating your own members about how they contribute to the vision will enable you to be effective in demonstrating the contributions your workgroup makes to the organization.

Any size workgroup may use the above process to demonstrate its value. For the most part, the resources required are minimal. Simply frame the information you currently present so it focuses on the outcomes important to your stakeholders. Convey it in language and terms your stakeholders can understand and relate to easily.


Alignment Solutions is a concise, bi-weekly newsletter written specifically to help organizational leaders optimize their business results. Your e-mail address is never shared with anyone for any reason. You may unsubscribe by clicking the link on the bottom of this e-mail.

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© 2014 Pat Lynch. All rights reserved.

Alignment Solutions Newsletter: Navigating Organizational Politics: No Bragging or Begging Required

March 12th, 2014


Navigating Organizational Politics:
No Bragging or Begging Required

Alignment solution: Successfully navigating your organization’s political environment does not require bragging or begging.

As a leader, how often do you feel that you are expected to brag and beg to get the resources needed to be successful in achieving your organization’s mission? How often do your employees feel the same way about their careers and professional success?

Regardless of their type, organizations inherently are political entities. While some, such as those in the public sector, are more overtly political than others, internal and external politics seldom are far from the surface. Consider the politics intrinsic in these common scenarios:

  • A manager can promote only one of several excellent candidates for a job.
  • A local school system wants voters to approve a bond issue to fund repairs.
  • A non-profit organization aspires to operate a halfway house in a residential area.
  • Managers at a service company are at odds with union members over an unpopular work rule.

Despite the fact that success depends heavily on their adeptness at navigating internal and external political processes, few leaders are willing or feel able to embrace that aspect of their jobs. One reason might be that politics in general have a bad reputation. For example, in a recent article, Washington Post columnist George Will quoted an individual who explained his reluctance to run for public office by saying, “Your parents warn you not to brag about yourself or beg, and what you do in politics is brag and beg.”

The fact is that while negotiating the relevant political system(s) effectively is part of an organizational leader’s job, bragging and begging are not necessary. Those who have been successful in navigating their political white waters engage effectively in at least four activities: (1) assiduously cultivating relationships, (2) learning and following the relevant political process(es), (3) demonstrating the value of the anticipated outcome to those affected, and (4) allowing stakeholders to make decisions along the way. Most notably, leaders who can show positive results communicate a powerful message. As St. Louis Cardinals pitcher Dizzy Dean famously proclaimed early in 1934 when he predicted that his team would win the World Series that year, “It ain’t bragging if you can back it up.” It turns out he wasn’t bragging.

Navigating the political process successfully without bragging or begging is a skill that can be learned and improved. To read about some time-tested, universal lessons in political acumen accumulated over the years by a fire chief who has been successful in guiding stakeholders through their political white waters, take a look at our article How to Succeed in Public Safety Politics without Bragging or Begging.


Alignment Solutions is a concise, bi-weekly newsletter written specifically to help organizational leaders optimize their business results. Your e-mail address is never shared with anyone for any reason. You may unsubscribe by clicking the link on the bottom of this e-mail.

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© 2014 Pat Lynch. All rights reserved.

Alignment Solutions Newsletter: U.S. Olympian Shares Teamwork Gold

February 26th, 2014


U.S. Olympian Shares Teamwork Gold

Alignment solution: The best team members know that for the good of the team, sometimes they must give less than 100% of their individual efforts.

Recently I spoke with an athlete who is a veteran of three U.S. Olympic water polo teams, including the 2008 silver medalist team. While reflecting on the years spent practicing and competing with his fellow elite athletes, he shared a key insight. Early in his career, he gave 100% of his effort in every practice and competition. In fact, he believed it was his duty always to do his absolute best, no matter the situation. What he came to realize, however, is that sometimes his all-out efforts actually hurt the team, such as when they prevented others from honing their skills or trying new techniques because he was always there to assist or to do it for them. His biggest “aha” moment, he said, came when he realized that for the team to be successful, sometimes he had to step back so that others could step forward.

To see the wisdom of this insight, one need only consider the very different experiences of the U.S. Olympic men’s basketball teams in 2004 and 2008. During the 2004 Games, team members played as individuals, going all out as they showcased the things they did best. As a result, the team, which on paper had the best talent in the world including young NBA stars, went home with the bronze medal. In contrast, the 2008 Games saw the athletes play as a team, holding back on their individual efforts when doing so was in their collective best interest. They earned the gold medal that year.

When people are passionate about what they do, their inclination is to give 100% all the time. Below are eight ways to help them internalize the reality that going all out sometimes may be counterproductive. The intended outcome is to enable them to optimize the team’s results by determining accurately when greater success requires the timely easing of individual efforts.

  1. Keep the big picture in mind. It’s about the best outcome for the customer, not about which team member exerts the most effort.
  2. Evaluate current approaches to see where there could be opportunities for team improvement by a strategic lessening of individual efforts.
  3. Show team members what’s in it for them to optimize their collective performance by engaging in compare and contrast scenarios.
  4. Teach your employees to hold back when necessary, and highlight the difference when the team’s outcome improves as a result.
  5. Allow new employees to learn by doing. Take the time to get to know the strengths and weaknesses of those who are new to your teams.
  6. Recognize that others will do things differently than you would, and that’s okay as long as the methods are legal and ethical.
  7. Take pride in your team members’ progress and accomplishments. Their success is your success.
  8. Set a powerful example for others by holding back when it’s appropriate for the good of the team.

Especially when employees are committed to achieving the best for their team or organization, they tend to want to give 100% of their individual efforts. Before doing so, they would be well advised to consider whether that decision will optimize the team’s or the organization’s success.


Alignment Solutions is a concise, bi-weekly newsletter written specifically to help organizational leaders optimize their business results. Your e-mail address is never shared with anyone for any reason. You may unsubscribe by clicking the link on the bottom of this e-mail.

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© 2014 Pat Lynch. All rights reserved.

Alignment Solutions Newsletter: Alignment through Enlightened Self-interest

February 12th, 2014


Alignment through Enlightened Self-interest

Alignment solution: To align others’ interests with your own, appeal to their enlightened self-interest

Years ago as a FedEx employee, I learned an important lesson in motivation. At that time I worked in the Mergers and Acquisitions department of the Treasury division. Those were heady days, with the company growing by leaps and bounds. One day we learned that a new pay-for-performance program would be implemented; it required all employees to identify outcome measures that demonstrated their value. While additional pay certainly was attractive, we scoffed at the notion that anyone could measure what WE did. As a result, we failed to turn in the required measures. Paying us a visit, our human resources (HR) representative made the situation very simple: “no measures, no money.” We came up with the requisite measures in record time.

As a university professor, I taught a required HR course that our fully employed MBA students usually assumed was about the “soft” side of management. Given that a sizable percentage of the students were engineers returning to study finance or accounting, the first day of class each semester found me facing a room full of adults who believed they had better things to do than learn about HR. Having been in their shoes when I worked at FedEx (i.e., a finance person who didn’t want to be bothered by “pesky” HR folks), I delivered this message: “Although you must take this class to earn your degree, the fact is that HR is the only course in this entire program in which you will learn things that will be of use regardless of your profession. Whether you are – or want to be – a manager, an employee, or a business owner, you will learn things you will use the rest of your life. So you can choose to be miserable for the next fourteen weeks, or to focus on learning information that will serve you well for a lifetime.” After I adopted that introduction, my MBA classes became a lot more enjoyable for the students as well as for me.

These examples exemplify the use of the biggest motivator I know: enlightened self-interest. The key to appealing successfully to people’s enlightened self-interest is to focus on the word ME in answering the question, “What’s in it for me?” from their perspectives. The answer cannot be about their team members, their organization, their friends, or even their families; it must be about them personally. In the first example, the benefit was higher pay; in the second, it was the value that would accrue to individuals as a result of knowing the ins and outs of managing people effectively.

The “enlightened” part of this concept is important: because we don’t always know what’s in our best interests, education plays a key role in aligning interests. In the first example, we learned that earning the rewards truly required measurable performance outcomes. The MBA students discovered that paying attention to something they had to do anyway could result in tangible benefits. With interests aligned, life became much easier for all parties, and desired results were achieved more rapidly and without the drama.

Next time you want or need to align others’ interests with your own, try appealing to their enlightened self-interest. You’ll be amazed at the results.


Alignment Solutions is a concise, bi-weekly newsletter written specifically to help organizational leaders optimize their business results. Your e-mail address is never shared with anyone for any reason. You may unsubscribe by clicking the link on the bottom of this e-mail.

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© 2014 Pat Lynch. All rights reserved.

Alignment Solutions Newsletter: The Power of Procedural Fairness

January 29th, 2014


The Power of Procedural Fairness

Alignment solution: People will accept even undesirable outcomes if they believe that the process used to arrive at those results is fair.

Leaders constantly have to make tough decisions that result in outcomes over which they have little or no control, such as when they must allocate scarce resources. Often those results seem unfair, or they have consequences that neither the leaders nor their employees like. The good news is that while leaders may not be able to control the outcomes of many decisions, they CAN control the process by which they make those decisions – i.e., its procedural fairness. This point is important: research and experience show that people will accept even undesirable outcomes IF they perceive that the processes used to arrive at those results are fair.

For example, let’s say there is only one open position and three equally well qualified candidates. There is no funding for additional positions either now or in the near future. Two of those individuals will be disappointed. However, if all three knew in advance the decision-making criteria, if they perceived that the decision process was transparent and free of bias, and if there had been an opportunity for them to provide meaningful input, then they will accept the outcome because the process was fair.

Perceptions of procedural fairness have implications for important workplace attitudes and behaviors. For example, compared to employees who see decision-making processes as unfair, those who perceive them as fair are more likely to go above and beyond what their jobs require, perform at a higher level, and trust decision-makers. The organization benefits as well: employees who perceive decision-making processes are fair are more satisfied with their jobs, committed to the organization, forgiving of workplace disappointments, and likely to contribute to organizational change than their counterparts who believe they are unfair.

Procedural fairness has many applications to decision-making in the workplace. Examples include decisions related to setting pay, making promotions, developing and implementing workplace rules, effecting organizational change, addressing disciplinary issues, and engaging in teamwork. There are many opportunities every day for leaders to realize the benefits of procedurally fair decision processes.

In short, fairness of the decision-making process is critical to the legitimacy of decisions as well as employees’ acceptance of them. Ensuring that employees perceive decisions as procedurally fair literally can transform your workplace from one in which complaints, distrust, cynicism, and dissatisfaction are common, to one in which employees take disappointments in stride and continue to contribute positively to the organization. As a leader, you have the power to shape your employees’ behaviors in a positive way or a negative way. Which outcome do you choose for your organization?

To learn seven steps you can take to ensure that your organization’s decision-making processes are perceived as fair, take a look at our article Ensuring Procedurally Fair Decision-making Processes.


Alignment Solutions is a concise, bi-weekly newsletter written specifically to help organizational leaders optimize their business results. Your e-mail address is never shared with anyone for any reason. You may unsubscribe by clicking the link on the bottom of this e-mail.

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© 2014 Pat Lynch. All rights reserved.

Alignment Solutions Newsletter: Specificity Works Wonders

January 16th, 2014


Specificity Works Wonders

Alignment solution: Asking specifically for what you want or need will enable people to do a better job of helping you achieve your objective.

When you ask people to do things, do you always get the results you expect? If not, you can significantly increase the likelihood of getting exactly the outcome you envision by increasing the specificity of your requests. By “specificity” I mean giving others the information they need to do as you ask.

Many people believe that when they make a request, they are giving others all the details they need to take the appropriate action. More often than not, they are wrong. Why? The appeals lack specificity. For example, saying, “Just fix it!” or “Just make it happen!” leaves a lot to the imagination, especially if the person you’re relying on isn’t clear about what “fixing” the issue means to you, or how to make “it” happen. Maybe you aren’t really sure either.

Here are some benefits to increasing the specificity of your requests: greater productivity because less re-work is required; less frustration because everyone is clear about the desired outcome; and decreased stress because people don’t have to guess what you mean and you can be more confident that you will get the result you want.

Below are seven ways to increase the likelihood that people will be able to do what you’ve asked them to do by boosting the specificity of your requests. Some are appropriate for all types of requests; others may be needed only when the assignment is new or complex.

  1. Think through your request in advance – e.g., exactly what outcome you want, to what extent (if any) you need to specify the methodology, and what constraints must be considered (e.g., cost, resources, time).
  2. Determine which assignment-related decisions you’re willing to delegate and which you are not, then provide the necessary guidance.
  3. Articulate clearly the outcome or result you are requesting.
    1. Provide enough detail so the “picture” of the desired outcome in the other person’s head is the same as the one in yours.
    2. Agree on how you both will know the assignment is complete.
  4. Describe the impact of the assignment – i.e., what difference it will make when completed.
  5. Check for understanding: ask the person to tell you what he/she believes you want, and/or how he/she intends to achieve that outcome.
  6. If the assignment is complex and/or long lasting, provide designated check-in times to ensure things are on track.
  7. Follow up afterward to let the person know what difference the assignment made. For example, “As a result of the directory you developed, you’ve made everyone’s lives easier because people inside and outside the organization now know exactly who to contact for their needs.”

Thinking through what you want, then giving people all the information they need to successfully accomplish what you’ve asked them to do will make everyone’s job easier. Why not let specificity work wonders for you?

To find other articles and resources that may be of value to you, I invite you to visit my web site at www.BusinessAlignmentStrategies.com and my blog at www.OptimizeBusinessResults.com.


Alignment Solutions is a concise, bi-weekly newsletter written specifically to help organizational leaders optimize their business results. Your e-mail address is never shared with anyone for any reason. You may unsubscribe by clicking the link on the bottom of this e-mail.

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© 2014 Pat Lynch. All rights reserved.

Setting Priorities Need Not Be an Elusive Competency

December 31st, 2013

The ability to set and, perhaps more importantly, to implement organizational priorities is a critical success factor for leaders. When there are dozens of things to be done, someone must step forward to bring order out of chaos. Too often, however, workplaces are filled with employees who feel discouraged because they are spinning their wheels, or frustrated by the lack of clear and consistent direction, or burned out because everything should have been done yesterday.

Here are some reasons why people find it difficult to set and implement priorities:

- Indecisiveness due to fear of making the “wrong” choice.

- Reluctance or inability to make hard decisions.

- Mistaken belief that good intentions are enough.

- Low level of importance or urgency.

- Lack of accountability – i.e., there are no consequences for non-performance.

Consider these facts:

- Priorities involve choices about how to use time.

- There can be only one “top” priority: by definition, there is a rank order to choices.

- Priorities are what you DO, not what you SAY you will do.

- When everything is a priority, nothing is a priority.

Here are ten ways to improve your ability to establish and implement priorities:

Establish priorities:

1. Realistically determine importance and urgency by asking and truthfully answering two questions: (1) “What’s the worst thing that can happen if I do/don’t do XYZ?” And (2) “Can I live with that outcome?”

2. Only people, things, and tasks that are directly aligned with achieving the mission or goals can be priorities.

3. Treat the setting of priorities as a resource allocation issue: develop realistic, WRITTEN time lines and schedules that indicate when you will accomplish what is needed to achieve each priority.

4. Use effective, easily utilized and understood decision-making tools (e.g., ranking, paired comparison, matrices, other forms of analysis).

5. Specify decision criteria BEFORE you start making choices.

Implement priorities:

6. Have someone hold you accountable for achieving your stated priorities.

7. Set your priorities BEFORE you make commitments that require your time.

8. Focus on the end result or “big picture.”

9. Identify a reasonable number of priorities at any given time; add others as you complete them.

10. Find a process that works well for you and follow it consistently.

If you could do only one thing to increase the quality of your life, it would be this: make self-care your #1 priority – not “one of the top” priorities or “a” top priority, but THE top priority. Why? Perhaps counter-intuitively, tending to your own needs enables you to do a much better job of taking care of others. There’s a very sound reason why airline flight attendants tell you to put your own oxygen mask on before trying to assist others: if you pass out, you are no good to anyone, including yourself. In fact, you have just become part of the problem.

As an added bonus: the techniques suggested above work just as well in personal situations as they do in the workplace.

© 2013 Pat Lynch. All rights reserved.

Alignment Solutions Newsletter Dec. 30, 2013

December 30th, 2013


How to Set Supervisors Up for Success

Alignment solution: To optimize your business results, invest in the quality of your supervisors.

Research and experience consistently demonstrate that the #1 reason employees leave organizations, and the primary reason they join unions, is dissatisfaction with their immediate supervisor. Unhappy workers cannot possibly provide excellent products or services, which means the organization’s bottom line will suffer. To increase the likelihood of success in your business, make sure you can attract and retain good employers by investing in your supervisors.

Research in the 1980s revealed that there are specific behaviors that influence employees’ satisfaction with their supervisors. None of those behaviors – e.g., the extent to which supervisors listen to workers, the way they treat those who make mistakes, and the degree to which they follow through to ensure problems get solved – are rocket science. However, people who are promoted to supervisory positions without benefit of training, preparation, or support seldom are fully successful because they simply haven’t been given the opportunity to learn how to manage effectively.

Here are seven ways that you can set your supervisors up for success:

  1. Provide realistic job previews during the selection process so candidates have an accurate picture of the position’s requirements.
  2. Ensure the candidates are willing and able to do (or learn to do) the appropriate managerial tasks.
  3. Once candidates are hired, set specific expectations of performance by clearly defining the required behaviors and results.
  4. Provide the necessary training and professional development at the beginning and throughout the supervisors’ careers.
  5. Help them make the transition from employee to boss.
  6. Reinforce desired behaviors and results.
  7. Help them pay special attention to the behaviors that influence employees’ satisfaction with their supervisors.

Providing this kind of support increases the likelihood that organizations will achieve their goals because they are able to attract and retain good employees. As the economy continues to improve, people will have more choices about where they work, especially those whose skills and abilities are highly valued. Supporting your supervisors so they can manage effectively will result in a huge return on the investment in their success.

To learn about additional behaviors that influence employees’ level of satisfaction with their supervisors, as well as how you can increase the likelihood of the supervisors’ success, take a look at our article How to Increase Employees’ Satisfaction with their Supervisors.

To find other articles and resources that may be of value to you, I invite you to visit my web site at www.BusinessAlignmentStrategies.com and my blog at www.OptimizeBusinessResults.com.


Alignment Solutions is a concise, bi-weekly newsletter written specifically to help organizational leaders optimize their business results. Your e-mail address is never shared with anyone for any reason. You may unsubscribe by clicking the link on the bottom of this e-mail.

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© 2013 Pat Lynch. All rights reserved.

Not Everyone is Capable of Being a Manager – Are You?

December 28th, 2013

If you have worked for nearly any organization in any capacity for any length of time, no doubt you have learned this fact: not everyone is capable of being a manager. Often employees are promoted to a supervisory/managerial position because they were really good at the job they were doing. Unfortunately management requires different skills, abilities, and competencies that they may not have. Sometimes the people who are hired or promoted have great potential, but their organizations don’t invest the resources in helping them be fully successful managers. In other cases, people are promoted to manager despite the fact that they don’t want the job: although they’d rather continue what they were doing, for some reason they felt compelled to accept the new, unwanted responsibilities.

Chances are very good that during your career you have had the misfortune of working for someone who never should have been a manager, or you’ve observed others (employees or supervisors/managers) in that situation – or perhaps you have been that person yourself. It’s not a pretty sight. And the results of this type of mis-match between person and position cause harm to the manager, the people he/she supervises, customers, vendors, and ultimately the organization.

So how do you know who is or is not capable of being a manager? Recently I saw a question on this topic posed by a journalist: what are some signs that people are NOT cut out for management? Although I prefer to answer questions from a positive perspective – in this case, pointing out signs that people ARE capable of being managers – I think there is some value here to identifying the characteristics that ought to disqualify candidates for managerial positions. Below are my answers to the original query. You are not cut out for management if you:

- don’t like people.

- don’t like working with others.

- don’t have passion for the business.

- are unwilling and/or unable to delegate tasks and responsibility.

- are unwilling and/or unable to give and receive constructive feedback.

- are unwilling and/or unable to act like a manager.

- are unwilling and/or unable to take on management tasks instead of doing whatever you used to do.

- are unwilling and/or unable to take responsibility for your employees’ poor performance.

- are unwilling and/or unable to develop your employees.

- need people to like you.

- need to be one of the “guys” instead of the boss.

- are a poor communicator.

- are inflexible.

So what about it? Are YOU capable of being a manager? If not, let others be the boss. You are better off pursuing a career path that allows you to be fully successful using the talents and competencies you DO have.

© 2013 Pat Lynch. All rights reserved.